Casos de investigação histórica para o aprendizado da natureza da ciência

Autores

  • Douglas Allchin University of Minnesota, 2005 Carroll Ave., St. Paul, MN 55104, USA.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47692/cadhistcienc.2017.v13.33802

Palavras-chave:

investigação histórica, aprendizagem por investigação, estudo de caso, natureza da ciência, história da ciência

Resumo

A História — quando formulada a partir de uma perspectiva histórica de ciência em construção — pode oferecer oportunidades para investigar e aprender sobre as Ciências Naturais. Este artigo descreve como várias características em narrativas históricas episódicas ajudam a estruturar tal investigação: (1) contextos motivacionais culturais e biográficos; (2) questões que problematizam as Ciências Naturais e promovem investigação sobre essa área; (3) perspectivas históricas que expõem a ciência em construção; (4) um formato narrativo; (5) uma estrutura episódica; (6) encerramento conjunto da investigação e da narrativa; e (7)reflexão final e consolidação dos aspectos das Ciências Naturais.

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Publicado

2017-12-31

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Allchin, D. (2017). Casos de investigação histórica para o aprendizado da natureza da ciência. Cadernos De História Da Ciência, 13(2), 101–126. https://doi.org/10.47692/cadhistcienc.2017.v13.33802